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Pharmacology

Cannabis in neurology—a potted review

Discovery of the endogenous cannabinoid signalling system unleashed substantial new research into several neurological conditions. A recent systematic review suggests that medical marijuana can improve a number of symptoms—particularly spasticity—in multiple sclerosis, but cannabinoids can have adverse psychological effects and their comparative effectiveness is unknown.

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Acknowledgements

J.Z. has received funding to conduct studies of cannabinoids in multiple sclerosis from the UK Medical Research Council.

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Correspondence to John Zajicek.

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Competing interests

J.Z. has received funding from the Institut für klinische Forschung, Berlin, which manufactures Cannador. R.H. declares no competing interests.

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Hosking, R., Zajicek, J. Cannabis in neurology—a potted review. Nat Rev Neurol 10, 429–430 (2014). https://doi.org/10.1038/nrneurol.2014.122

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