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Chronic kidney disease: Intensive blood pressure reduction lowers mortality in CKD

Hypertension is a risk factor for chronic kidney disease (CKD), but the optimal blood pressure (BP) target in patients with stage 3–5 CKD is unclear. Now, a meta-analysis reports that more-intensive BP control is associated with a reduced risk of all-cause mortality compared with less-intensive BP goals in this high-risk population.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Maryland 21205, USA; The Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology and Clinical Research, 2024 East Monument Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA; and at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, 330 Brookline Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA.

    • Stephen P. Juraschek
  2. Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Maryland 21205, USA; and The Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology and Clinical Research, 2024 East Monument Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA.

    • Lawrence J. Appel

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Competing interests

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Lawrence J. Appel.