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Neuroscience and education: myths and messages

Abstract

For several decades, myths about the brain — neuromyths — have persisted in schools and colleges, often being used to justify ineffective approaches to teaching. Many of these myths are biased distortions of scientific fact. Cultural conditions, such as differences in terminology and language, have contributed to a 'gap' between neuroscience and education that has shielded these distortions from scrutiny. In recent years, scientific communications across this gap have increased, although the messages are often distorted by the same conditions and biases as those responsible for neuromyths. In the future, the establishment of a new field of inquiry that is dedicated to bridging neuroscience and education may help to inform and to improve these communications.

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Figure 1: Imaging studies of interventions are of particular interest to education.

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Howard-Jones, P. Neuroscience and education: myths and messages. Nat Rev Neurosci 15, 817–824 (2014). https://doi.org/10.1038/nrn3817

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