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Understanding microRNAs in neurodegeneration

Abstract

Interest in the functions of microRNAs (miRNAs) in the nervous system has recently expanded to include their roles in neurodegeneration. Investigations have begun to reveal the influence of miRNAs on both neuronal survival and the accumulation of toxic proteins that are associated with neurodegeneration, and are providing clues as to how these toxic proteins can influence miRNA expression.

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Figure 1: mRNA repression by microRNAs and their effect on neurodegeneration.

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Acknowledgements

We apologize to authors whose papers were not discussed here owing to the short format. This work was funded by United States Public Health Service grant DA00266. T.M.D. is the Leonard and Madlyn Abramson Professor in Neurodegenerative Diseases at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

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Correspondence to Ted M. Dawson or Valina L. Dawson.

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DATABASES

mirBase

mir-9

miR-124

miR-132

miR-133b

miR-433

miR-659

OMIM

FTLD

FURTHER INFORMATION

Ted M. Dawson's homepage

Valina L. Dawson's homepage

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Eacker, S., Dawson, T. & Dawson, V. Understanding microRNAs in neurodegeneration. Nat Rev Neurosci 10, 837–841 (2009). https://doi.org/10.1038/nrn2726

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