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Erratum: Silent synapses and the emergence of a postsynaptic mechanism for LTP

The Original Article was published on 15 October 2008

Nature Reviews Neuroscience 9, 813–825 (2008)

In the above article, an important reference was omitted and appropriate credit was not given for the first observation of silent synapses by laser-evoked glutamate uncaging on to single, visually identified dendritic spines. In the rat hippocampal CA1 region, Beique et al.1 observed thin spines that exhibited an NMDAR-mediated response at +40 mV, but no AMPAR-mediated response at −70 mV, a little over a year before a similar observation by Busetto et al.2.

References

  1. Beique, J. C. et al. Synapse-specific regulation of AMPA receptor function by PSD-95. Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 103, 19535–19540 (2006).

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  2. Busetto, G., Higley, M. J. & Sabatini, B. L. Developmental presence and disappearance of postsynaptically silent synapses on dendritic spines of rat layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons. J. Physiol. 586, 1519–1527 (2008).

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The online version of the original article can be found at 10.1038/nrn2501

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Kerchner, G., Nicoll, R. Erratum: Silent synapses and the emergence of a postsynaptic mechanism for LTP. Nat Rev Neurosci 10, 242 (2009). https://doi.org/10.1038/nrn2595

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