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On the relationship between emotion and cognition

Abstract

The current view of brain organization supports the notion that there is a considerable degree of functional specialization and that many regions can be conceptualized as either 'affective' or 'cognitive'. Popular examples are the amygdala in the domain of emotion and the lateral prefrontal cortex in the case of cognition. This prevalent view is problematic for a number of reasons. Here, I will argue that complex cognitive–emotional behaviours have their basis in dynamic coalitions of networks of brain areas, none of which should be conceptualized as specifically affective or cognitive. Central to cognitive–emotional interactions are brain areas with a high degree of connectivity, called hubs, which are critical for regulating the flow and integration of information between regions.

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Figure 1: Brain connectivity graph.
Figure 2: Circuit for the processing of visual information.
Figure 3: Circuit for executive control.
Figure 4: Conceptual proposal for the relationship between anatomical sites, neural computations and behaviours.

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Acknowledgements

In the preparation of this article, I greatly benefited from feedback from and discussions with H. Barbas, L. Feldman Barrett, J. Moll, L. Oliveira, M. Pereira, A. Seth, O. Sporns, E. Thompson and R. Todd. I would also like to thank the reviewers for their constructive feedback and the National Institute of Mental Health (MH071589) for supporting my research.

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Pessoa, L. On the relationship between emotion and cognition. Nat Rev Neurosci 9, 148–158 (2008). https://doi.org/10.1038/nrn2317

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