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The cortical organization of speech processing

Nature Reviews Neuroscience volume 8, pages 393402 (2007) | Download Citation

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Abstract

Despite decades of research, the functional neuroanatomy of speech processing has been difficult to characterize. A major impediment to progress may have been the failure to consider task effects when mapping speech-related processing systems. We outline a dual-stream model of speech processing that remedies this situation. In this model, a ventral stream processes speech signals for comprehension, and a dorsal stream maps acoustic speech signals to frontal lobe articulatory networks. The model assumes that the ventral stream is largely bilaterally organized — although there are important computational differences between the left- and right-hemisphere systems — and that the dorsal stream is strongly left-hemisphere dominant.

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Acknowledgements

Supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health.

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Affiliations

  1. Gregory Hickok is at the Department of Cognitive Sciences and the Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, University of California, Irvine, California 92697-5100, USA.

    • Gregory Hickok
    •  & David Poeppel
  2. David Poeppel is at the Departments of Linguistics and Biology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742, USA.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/nrn2113

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