Opinion

Is mood chemistry?

  • Nature Reviews Neuroscience volume 6, pages 241246 (2005)
  • doi:10.1038/nrn1629
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Published:

Abstract

The chemical hypothesis of depression suggests that mood disorders are caused by a chemical imbalance in the brain, which can be corrected by antidepressant drugs. However, recent evidence indicates that problems in information processing within neural networks, rather than changes in chemical balance, might underlie depression, and that antidepressant drugs induce plastic changes in neuronal connectivity, which gradually lead to improvements in neuronal information processing and recovery of mood.

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Mouse Genome Informatics

  1. BDNF

    • 5-HT1A

      Acknowledgements

      I would like to thank H. Rauvala, M. Saarma, M. Castrén and R. Galuske for their comments to the manuscript, and the Sigrid Jusélius Foundation, Sohlberg Foundation and the Academy of Finland and for support.

      Author information

      Affiliations

      1. Eero Castrén is at the Neuroscience Center, University of Helsinki, Finland.  eero.castren@helsinki.fi

        • Eero Castrén

      Authors

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      Competing interests

      The author declares no competing financial interests.