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Science and society – vaccines

Ethical issues for vaccines and immunization

Nature Reviews Immunology volume 2, pages 291296 (2002) | Download Citation

Abstract

Vaccination is the only type of medical intervention that has eliminated a disease successfully. However, both in countries with high immunization rates and in countries that are too impoverished to protect their citizens, many dilemmas and controversies surround immunization. This article describes some of the ethical issues involved, and presents some challenges and concepts for the global community.

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Acknowledgements

We would like to thank C. Wiley and, in particular, R. Ingrum for their assistance.

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Jeffrey B. Ulmer is at Vaccines Research, Chiron Corporation, 4560 Horton Street, Emeryville, California 94608, USA.

    • Jeffrey B. Ulmer
  2. Margaret A. Liu is at Transgene, 11 rue de Molshelm, 67082 Strasbourg Cedex, France.

    • Margaret A. Liu

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Corresponding author

Correspondence to Margaret A. Liu.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nri780

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