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The ageing immune system: is it ever too old to become young again?

Nature Reviews Immunology volume 9, pages 5762 (2009) | Download Citation

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Abstract

Ageing is accompanied by a decline in the function of the immune system, which increases susceptibility to infections and can decrease the quality of life. The ability to rejuvenate the ageing immune system would therefore be beneficial for elderly individuals and would decrease health-care costs for society. But is the immune system ever too old to become young again? We review here the promise of various approaches to rejuvenate the function of the immune system in the rapidly growing ageing population.

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Acknowledgements

Work from our laboratory was supported by grant AG21450 from the National Institutes of Health, USA.

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  1. Kenneth Dorshkind, Encarnacion Montecino-Rodriguez and Robert A. J. Signer are at the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA.

    • Kenneth Dorshkind
    • , Encarnacion Montecino-Rodriguez
    •  & Robert A. J. Signer

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Correspondence to Kenneth Dorshkind.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nri2471

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