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New roles for TIM family members in immune regulation

Nature Reviews Immunology volume 8, pages 577580 (2008) | Download Citation

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Abstract

Members of the TIM (T-cell immunoglobulin domain and mucin domain) protein family are emerging as important regulators of immune responses. As their names imply, the TIM proteins were originally thought to be T-cell-specific molecules that served mainly to regulate T-helper-cell responses. However, the recent discovery that antigen-presenting cells also express TIM molecules and the identification of new TIM-protein ligands has expanded the known roles of the TIM proteins in immune regulation.

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  1. Vijay K. Kuchroo, Valerie Dardalhon, Sheng Xiao and Ana C. Anderson are at the Center for Neurologic Diseases, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.

    • Vijay K. Kuchroo
    • , Valerie Dardalhon
    • , Sheng Xiao
    •  & Ana C. Anderson

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Correspondence to Vijay K. Kuchroo.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nri2366

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