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Stress-induced immune dysfunction: implications for health

Nature Reviews Immunology volume 5, pages 243251 (2005) | Download Citation

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Abstract

Folk wisdom has long suggested that stressful events take a toll on health. The field of psychoneuroimmunology (PNI) is now providing key mechanistic evidence about the ways in which stressors — and the negative emotions that they generate — can be translated into physiological changes. PNI researchers have used animal and human models to learn how the immune system communicates bidirectionally with the central nervous and endocrine systems and how these interactions impact on health.

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Acknowledgements

We thank J. Sheridan, D. Padgett, R. Bonneau, R. Nelson, N. Quan and V. Sanders for helpful suggestions. Work on this paper was supported, in part, by grants from the General Clinical Research Center (Columbus, United States) and the Comprehensive Cancer Center, (Columbus, United States).

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  1. Ronald Glaser is at the Department of Molecular Virology, Immunology and Medical Genetics, the College of Medicine and Public Health, the Institute for Behavioral Medical Research and the Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210, USA.

    • Ronald Glaser
  2. Janice K. Kiecolt-Glaser is at the Department of Psychiatry, the College of Medicine and Public Health, the Institute for Behavioral Medical Research and the Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210, USA.

    • Janice K. Kiecolt-Glaser

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The authors declare no competing financial interests.

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Correspondence to Ronald Glaser.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/nri1571

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