Review Article | Published:

The mucosal immune system: master regulator of bidirectional gut–brain communications

Nature Reviews Gastroenterology & Hepatology volume 14, pages 143159 (2017) | Download Citation

Abstract

Communication between the brain and gut is not one-way, but a bidirectional highway whereby reciprocal signals between the two organ systems are exchanged to coordinate function. The messengers of this complex dialogue include neural, metabolic, endocrine and immune mediators responsive to diverse environmental cues, including nutrients and components of the intestinal microbiota (microbiota–gut–brain axis). We are now starting to understand how perturbation of these systems affects transition between health and disease. The pathological repercussions of disordered gut–brain dialogue are probably especially pertinent in functional gastrointestinal diseases, including IBS and functional dyspepsia. New insights into these pathways might lead to novel treatment strategies in these common gastrointestinal diseases. In this Review, we consider the role of the immune system as the gatekeeper and master regulator of brain–gut and gut–brain communications. Although adaptive immunity (T cells in particular) participates in this process, there is an emerging role for cells of the innate immune compartment (including innate lymphoid cells and cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system). We will also consider how these key immune cells interact with the specific components of the enteric and central nervous systems, and rapidly respond to environmental variables, including the microbiota, to alter gut homeostasis.

Key points

  • Common gastrointestinal diseases, such as IBS, functional dyspepsia and IBD, are closely linked to psychological morbidity

  • This link is driven in part through bidirectional signalling between the brain and gut, which reciprocally regulate each other

  • Growing evidence implicates the importance of immune activation, which might be overt (IBD) or more subtle (IBS, functional dyspepsia) in pathological gut–brain interactions

  • The composition of the intestinal microbiota affects behaviour and mood, which could in part rely on selective activation of distinct host cytokine responses

  • Therapeutic targeting of gut microorganisms, host immunity or psychological symptoms could hold the key to uncoupling pathological interactions between the gut and brain

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Affiliations

  1. Experimental Immunobiology, Division of Transplant Immunology and Mucosal Biology, Great Maze Pond, King's College London, SE1 9RT, UK.

    • Nick Powell
  2. University of Newcastle, Faculty of Health and Medicine, School of Medicine & Public Health, Callaghan NSW 2308, Australia.

    • Marjorie M. Walker
    •  & Nicholas J. Talley

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Contributions

N.P. and M.M.W. researched data for the article, N.P. wrote the article and N.P., M.M.W. and N.J.T. made substantial contributions to discussion of content and reviewed or edited the manuscript before submission.

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The authors declare no competing financial interests.

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Correspondence to Nick Powell.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/nrgastro.2016.191

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