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Neuroendocrinology

Electromagnetic control of neural activity — prospective physics for physicians

Rapid, minimally invasive control of explicit neural activity would be a major advance for basic and clinical research in the neuroscience and neuroendocrinology fields, and could have applications for the potential treatment of neurological disorders. A new study by Stanley et al. brings us closer to this goal.

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Correspondence to Michael J. Krashes.

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Funderburk, S., Krashes, M. Electromagnetic control of neural activity — prospective physics for physicians. Nat Rev Endocrinol 12, 316–317 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1038/nrendo.2016.65

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