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Slow food, fast food and the control of food intake

Nature Reviews Endocrinology volume 6, pages 290293 (2010) | Download Citation

Abstract

This Perspective focuses on two elements of our food supply and eating environment that facilitate high energy intake: a high eating rate and distraction of attention from eating. These two elements are believed to undermine our body's capacity to regulate its energy intake at healthy levels because they impair the congruent association between sensory signals and metabolic consequences. The findings of a number of studies show that foods that can be eaten quickly lead to high food intake and low satiating effects—the reason being that these foods only provide brief periods of sensory exposure, which give the human body insufficient cues for satiation. Future research should focus on the underlying physiological, neurological and molecular mechanisms through which our current eating environment affects our control of food intake.

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Affiliations

  1. Division of Human Nutrition, Wageningen University, PO Box 8129, 6700 EV Wageningen, The Netherlands

    • Cees de Graaf
    •  & Frans J. Kok

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The authors declare no competing financial interests.

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Correspondence to Cees de Graaf.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nrendo.2010.41

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