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Looking backwards: a possible new path for drug discovery in psychopharmacology

Nature Reviews Drug Discovery volume 1, pages 10031006 (2002) | Download Citation

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Abstract

The history of psychopharmacology is littered with type II errors — the rejection of effective compounds in the specious belief that they were inefficacious because they had failed to beat placebo in a controlled trial. Revisiting some of these drugs to establish their receptor profile, and then determining what patentable compounds now on the shelf match that profile, might represent a possible future pathway to drug discovery. This article looks at the special circumstances in which numerous potentially effective drugs were withdrawn in the United States.

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Affiliations

  1. Edward Shorter is at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, 88 College Street, Toronto, M5G 1LY Canada.  eshorter@sympatico.ca

    • Edward Shorter

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nrd964

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