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Therapeutic vaccination for chronic diseases: a new class of drugs in sight

Nature Reviews Drug Discovery volume 3, pages 8188 (2004) | Download Citation

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Abstract

The induction of antibodies by prophylactic vaccination against infectious diseases has been the most effective medical intervention in human history. More recently, monoclonal antibodies specific for host proteins have proven to be highly effective for the treatment of acute and chronic diseases. However, the costs of protein therapies and their inconvenience for the patient are major obstacles for their wide-spread use. We suggest that the movement from the passive administration of monoclonal antibodies to active vaccination against self-molecules could be the next logical step in drug development, providing affordable medicines and broader patient acceptance and compliance.

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Acknowledgements

We would like to thank W. Renner, P. Müller, G. Jennings and M. Kopf for helpful discussions and S. Fellmann for excellent secretarial assistance.

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Affiliations

  1. Martin F. Bachmann and Mark R. Dyer are at Cytos Biotechnology AG, Wagistr 25, Schlieren-Zürich, Switzerland.  martin.bachmann@cytos.com  mark.dyer@cytos.com

    • Martin F. Bachmann
    •  & Mark R. Dyer

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Competing interests

Authors have shares and options in Cytos, a company involved in therapeutic vaccination.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nrd1284

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