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Oligometastases revisited

Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology volume 8, pages 378382 (2011) | Download Citation

Abstract

We previously proposed a clinical state of metastasis termed 'oligometastases' that refers to restricted tumor metastatic capacity. The implication of this concept is that local cancer treatments are curative in a proportion of patients with metastases. Here we review clinical and laboratory data that support the hypothesis that oligometastasis is a distinct clinical entity. Investigations of the prevalence, mechanism of occurrence, and position in the metastatic cascade, as well as the determination of molecular markers to distinguish oligometastatic from polymetastatic disease, are ongoing.

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Acknowledgements

The authors are supported by grants from the Ludwig Foundation for Cancer Research, the Lung Cancer Research Foundation, and a generous gift from the Foglia Foundation.

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, The Ludwig Center for Metastasis Research, The University of Chicago Medical Center, 5758 South Maryland Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637, USA

    • Ralph R. Weichselbaum
    •  & Samuel Hellman

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Contributions

Both authors contributed to researching data for the article, discussion of the content, and writing and editing the manuscript.

Competing interests

R. R. Weichselbaum is a stock-holder or Director with the following companies: GenVec, Catherex, and Reflexion. S. Hellman is a stock-holder or Director at InSightec.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Ralph R. Weichselbaum.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nrclinonc.2011.44

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