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Targeted therapies

Bevacizumab—has it reached its final resting place?

The recent failure of bevacizumab in the adjuvant setting has forced us to consider what has gone wrong. It is possible that with careful analysis and novel biomarkers, we may not yet have to lay bevacizumab to rest.

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Correspondence to David J. Kerr.

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Competing interests

D. J. Kerr receives honoraria and research support from Roche. A. M. Young declares no competing interests.

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Kerr, D., Young, A. Bevacizumab—has it reached its final resting place?. Nat Rev Clin Oncol 8, 195–196 (2011). https://doi.org/10.1038/nrclinonc.2011.32

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