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Air pollution and cardiovascular disease: a window of opportunity

The recent publication of The Lancet Commission on pollution and health is a watershed moment for one of the greatest challenges to cardiovascular health. In this Comment article, we discuss the global burden of air pollution on cardiovascular health.

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Figure 1: Conceptual diagram illustrating a combined population-level and individual-level approach to mitigating air pollution exposures and protecting cardiovascular health.

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Acknowledgements

R.V. is supported by grant 1R21HL140474. The content of this article is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.

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Correspondence to Michael B. Hadley.

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The authors declare no competing financial interests.

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Hadley, M., Vedanthan, R. & Fuster, V. Air pollution and cardiovascular disease: a window of opportunity. Nat Rev Cardiol 15, 193–194 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1038/nrcardio.2017.207

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