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Survivors of childhood and adolescent cancer: life-long risks and responsibilities

Nature Reviews Cancer volume 14, pages 6170 (2014) | Download Citation

Abstract

Survival rates for most paediatric cancers have improved at a remarkable pace over the past four decades. In developed countries, cure is now the probable outcome for most children and adolescents who are diagnosed with cancer: their 5-year survival rate approaches 80%. However, the vast majority of these cancer survivors will have at least one chronic health condition by 40 years of age. The burden of responsibility to understand the long-term morbidity and mortality that is associated with currently successful treatments must be borne by many, including the research and health care communities, survivor advocacy groups, and governmental and policy-making entities.

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Acknowledgements

Research grant support: L.L.R. and M.M.H. are supported in part by the Cancer Center Support (CORE) grant CA 21765 from the US National Cancer Institute and by the American Lebanese Syrian Associated Charities (ALSAC).

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Affiliations

  1. Department of Epidemiology and Cancer Control, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, 262 Danny Thomas Place, Memphis, Tennessee 38105, USA.

    • Leslie L. Robison
    •  & Melissa M. Hudson
  2. Department of Oncology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, 262 Danny Thomas Place, Memphis, Tennessee 38105, USA.

    • Melissa M. Hudson

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  1. Search for Leslie L. Robison in:

  2. Search for Melissa M. Hudson in:

Competing interests

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Leslie L. Robison.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/nrc3634