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Comparative biology of mouse versus human cells: modelling human cancer in mice

Nature Reviews Cancer volume 3, pages 952959 (2003) | Download Citation

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Abstract

Laboratory mice have represented a powerful experimental system for understanding the intricacy of human cancer pathogenesis. Indeed, much of our current conceptualization of how tumorigenesis occurs in humans is strongly influenced by mouse models of cancer development. However, an emerging body of evidence indicates that there are fundamental differences in how the process of tumorigenesis occurs in mice and humans. What are these species-specific differences and how do they affect the use of mice as models of human tumour pathogenesis?

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Acknowledgements

We apologize to those colleagues whose work could not be cited due to space restrictions. We thank I. Ben-Porath, T. Ince and A.E. Karnoub for critical reading of the manuscript, and R. Latek for help with protein modelling. A.R. is currently supported by the Department of Defense CDMRP Grant and R.A.W. is supported by the Department of Health and Human Services, NIH/NCI, Research Program Project Grant.

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  1. Annapoorni Rangarajan and Robert Weinberg are at the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, 9 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. Robert Weinberg is also at the Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA.  weinberg@wi.mit.edu

    • Annapoorni Rangarajan
    •  & Robert A. Weinberg

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The authors declare no competing financial interests.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/nrc1235

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