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Tools for investigating peptide–protein interactions: peptide incorporation of environment-sensitive fluorophores via on-resin derivatization

Nature Protocols volume 2, pages 32013209 (2007) | Download Citation

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Abstract

This protocol presents the peptide incorporation of environment-sensitive fluorophores derived from the dimethylaminophthalimide family. The procedure utilizes anhydride precursors of 4-dimethylaminophthalimide (4-DMAP) or 6-dimethylaminonaphthalimide (6-DMN), whose syntheses are described in a related protocol from these authors. In this protocol, the fluorophores are directly incorporated after solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) via on-resin derivatization of peptides prepared using commercially available diamino acids, which are Alloc-protected on the side-chain amino group. The time required to complete the procedure depends on the size and number of peptides targeted. As an alternative to this approach, the corresponding fluorescent amino acids can be obtained in an Fmoc-protected form for convenient use as building blocks in SPPS. This option is described in a related protocol by these authors.

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Acknowledgements

This research was supported by NSF CHE-0414243 (to B.I.) and the Cell Migration Consortium (GM064346). The award of a Marie Curie Fellowship to M.S. is also gratefully acknowledged.

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139-4307, USA.

    • Matthieu Sainlos
    •  & Barbara Imperiali
  2. Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139-4307, USA.

    • Barbara Imperiali

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Competing interests

The authors declare that a patent on the environment–sensitive fluorophores is pending: “Fluorescent Probes for Biological Studies” by Imperiali et al. US Patent Application serial No. 11/106,349, filed April 13, 2005, pending.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Barbara Imperiali.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nprot.2007.442

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