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Correction: Gates Foundation backs high-risk science for big wins

The Original Article was published on 03 March 2015

Nature Plants 1, 15022 (2015); published online 3 March 2015; corrected 1 April 2015

The original version of this News article incorrectly reported that the successful engineering of Rubisco genes from the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus into tobacco raised the rate of photosynthesis fourfold. In fact, photosynthesis ran slower in the transgenic compared with the wild-type plants, but the transgenic plants were capable of autotrophic growth. The text should have read 'In previous work, Rubisco genes from the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus were successfully engineered into tobacco, a common model plant, yielding photosynthetically-competent plants3. The RIPE team aspires to engineer the Rubisco genes of other species into food crops, to enhance photosynthetic potential.' This error has been corrected.

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The online version of the original article can be found at 10.1038/nplants.2015.22

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Gilbert, N. Correction: Gates Foundation backs high-risk science for big wins. Nature Plants 1, 15054 (2015). https://doi.org/10.1038/nplants.2015.54

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