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Plant science and the food security agenda

Nature Plants volume 1, Article number: 15173 (2015) | Download Citation

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Plant science has an important part to play in meeting the global food security challenge. But, advances will be most effective if better coupled with agronomic science and the broader food security agenda.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. John S. I. Ingram is at the Environmental Change Institute, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QY, UK.

    • John S. I. Ingram
  2. John R. Porter is at the Copenhagen Plant Science Centre, Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Thorvaldsensvej 40, DK-1871, Denmark.

    • John R. Porter

Authors

  1. Search for John S. I. Ingram in:

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Corresponding authors

Correspondence to John S. I. Ingram or John R. Porter.

About this article

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nplants.2015.173

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