Commentary | Published:

Fly me to the Moon?

Nature Physics volume 3, pages 669671 (2007) | Download Citation

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The revival of interest in lunar and planetary exploration is prompting astronomers to re-evaluate the advantages of observatories on the Moon. But the debate is much more than one of science versus money, and goes to the inspirational heart of space exploration.

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Affiliations

  1. Mike Lockwood is in the School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton, SO17 1BJ, UK, and the Space Science and Technology Department, STFC/Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot OX11 0QX, UK. M.Lockwood@rl.ac.uk

    • Mike Lockwood

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nphys733

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