News & Views | Published:

High-harmonic generation

The bright side of downsizing

Nature Physics volume 13, pages 626628 (2017) | Download Citation

The shorter the antenna, the higher the frequency — so what happens when nanoantennas hit optical frequencies? One answer may lead to high-harmonic generation without the need for high-powered lasers.

Access optionsAccess options

Rent or Buy article

Get time limited or full article access on ReadCube.

from$8.99

All prices are NET prices.

References

  1. 1.

    et al. Nat. Phys. 13, 660–663 (2017).

  2. 2.

    & Rev. Mod. Phys. 81, 163–234 (2009).

  3. 3.

    et al. Nature 453, 757–760 (2008).

  4. 4.

    , , & Nat. Phys. 9, 304–309 (2013).

  5. 5.

    et al. Nat. Commun. 7, 13105 (2016).

  6. 6.

    & Nat. Mater. 13, 139–150 (2014).

  7. 7.

    et al. Preprint at (2016).

Download references

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Alexandra Landsman is at the Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Dresden 01187, Germany

    • Alexandra Landsman

Authors

  1. Search for Alexandra Landsman in:

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Alexandra Landsman.

About this article

Publication history

Published

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nphys4131

Newsletter Get the most important science stories of the day, free in your inbox. Sign up for Nature Briefing