Article | Published:

Raman coherence in a circuit quantum electrodynamics lambda system

Nature Physics volume 12, pages 7579 (2016) | Download Citation

Abstract

Atomic three-level Λ systems dressed by two coherent electromagnetic fields can exhibit coherent population trapping and electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) due to quantum interference. By addressing the combined qubit–cavity states of a superconducting transmon qubit in a three-dimensional copper cavity with two microwave drives we establish an effective Λ system, two legs of which are defined by a dipole transition and a two-photon transition. This circuit-based system allows the observation of three-microwave-photon Raman coherence effects, including coherent population trapping and EIT, which are demonstrated here with both steady-state spectroscopic techniques and time-domain measurements. By sending Gaussian microwave pulses through the cavity in the EIT regime, a negative group velocity of the pulse is observed with the peak of the pulse exiting the cavity 9.4 μs before entering.

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Acknowledgements

F.C.W. would like to acknowledge support from the Joint Quantum Institute and the State of Maryland through the Center for Nanophysics and Advanced Materials. The authors would like to thank J. Lefebvre for technical support.

Author information

Author notes

    • S. Novikov
    • , J. E. Robinson
    •  & B. Suri

    Present addresses: Northrop Grumman Electronic Systems, Linthicum, Maryland 21090, USA (S.N.); US Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, Maryland 20783, USA (J.E.R.); Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience, Chalmers University of Technology, 41296-Gothenburg, Sweden (B.S.).

Affiliations

  1. Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742, USA

    • S. Novikov
    • , S. P. Premaratne
    • , B. Suri
    • , F. C. Wellstood
    •  & B. S. Palmer
  2. Laboratory for Physical Sciences, College Park, Maryland 20740, USA

    • S. Novikov
    • , T. Sweeney
    • , J. E. Robinson
    • , S. P. Premaratne
    • , B. Suri
    •  & B. S. Palmer
  3. Joint Quantum Institute and Center for Nanophysics and Advanced Materials, College Park, Maryland 20742, USA

    • F. C. Wellstood

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Contributions

S.N. designed and performed the experiments, and analysed the data. S.N. and B.S.P. wrote the manuscript. S.P.P. obtained the Ramsey data for qubit calibration. S.N., T.S., F.C.W. and B.S.P. developed the theoretical model. S.N., T.S. and B.S.P. carried out the numerical simulations. T.S., J.E.R. and B.S. advised on experimental techniques. F.C.W. and B.S.P. supervised fabrication, experiments and data analysis. All authors discussed the results and commented on the manuscript.

Competing interests

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to B. S. Palmer.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nphys3537

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