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Soft matter

A triangular affair

Nature Physics volume 10, pages 185186 (2014) | Download Citation

Disks interacting via particular potentials self-organize into triangles that stabilize mosaics with 10-, 12-, 18- and 24-fold symmetry, as revealed by computer simulations. Discoveries of further novel quasicrystals may now be within reach.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Michael Engel and Sharon C. Glotzer* are at the Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA

    • Michael Engel
    •  & Sharon C. Glotzer

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Corresponding author

Correspondence to Sharon C. Glotzer.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nphys2903

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