Crystallization

Colloidal suspense

According to classical nucleation theory, a crystal grows from a small nucleus that already bears the symmetry of its end phase — but experiments with colloids now reveal that, from an amorphous precursor, crystallites with different structures can develop.

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Figure 1: Crystal nucleation in colloidal suspensions is a two-step process, the first of which involves the formation of amorphous precursors with different types of short-range order.

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Correspondence to László Gránásy or Gyula I. Tóth.

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Gránásy, L., Tóth, G. Colloidal suspense. Nature Phys 10, 12–13 (2014). https://doi.org/10.1038/nphys2849

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