Magnetic resonance imaging

A cryptic contrast agent

Rare gases provide unique opportunities to examine patients and materials with magnetic resonance imaging. A new entry, krypton, offers interesting properties that could move the field forward.

Access options

Rent or Buy article

Get time limited or full article access on ReadCube.

from$8.99

All prices are NET prices.

Figure 1: Creation and imaging of hyperpolarized krypton-83 (represented by green balls) is accomplished by laser optical pumping of rubidium atoms (blue balls) in a gas-phase optical cell, followed by transfer to a magnet.

References

  1. 1

    Pavlovskaya, G. E., Cleveland, Z. I., Stupic, K. F., Basaraba, R. J. & Meersmann, T. Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 102, 18275–18279 (2005).

  2. 2

    Albert, M. et al. Nature 370, 199–201 (1994).

  3. 3

    Duhamel, G. et al. C. R. Acad. Sci. IIc 4, 789–794 (2001).

  4. 4

    Walker T. G. & Happer W. Rev. Mod. Phys. 69, 629–642 (1997).

  5. 5

    Golman, K., Ardenkjær-Larsen, J. H., Petersson, J. S., Månsson, S. & Leunbach, I. Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 100, 10435–10439 (2003).

  6. 6

    Horton-Garcia, C. F., Pavlovskaya, G. E. & Meersmann, T. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 127, 1958–1962 (2005).

  7. 7

    Stupic, K. F., Cleveland, Z. I., Pavlovskaya, G. E. & Meersmann, T. Solid State Nucl. Magn. Reson. 29, 79–84 (2006).

  8. 8

    Kauczor H. U. et al. Radiology 201, 564–568 (1996).

Download references

Author information

Affiliations

Authors

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Cite this article

Raftery, D. A cryptic contrast agent. Nature Phys 2, 77–78 (2006). https://doi.org/10.1038/nphys224

Download citation

Further reading