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Multi-dimensional single-spin nano-optomechanics with a levitated nanodiamond

Nature Photonics volume 9, pages 653657 (2015) | Download Citation

Abstract

Considerable advances made in the development of nanomechanical and nano-optomechanical devices have enabled the observation of quantum effects1,2,3,4, improved sensitivity to minute forces5,6, and provided avenues to probe fundamental physics at the nanoscale7,8,9. Concurrently, solid-state quantum emitters with optically accessible spin degrees of freedom have been pursued in applications ranging from quantum information science10,11 to nanoscale sensing12. Here, we demonstrate a hybrid nano-optomechanical system composed of a nanodiamond (containing a single nitrogen–vacancy centre) that is levitated in an optical dipole trap. The mechanical state of the diamond is controlled by modulation of the optical trapping potential. We demonstrate the ability to imprint the multi-dimensional mechanical motion of the cavity-free mechanical oscillator into the nitrogen–vacancy centre fluorescence and manipulate the mechanical system's intrinsic spin. This result represents the first step towards a hybrid quantum system based on levitating nanoparticles that simultaneously engages optical, phononic and spin degrees of freedom.

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Acknowledgements

L.P.N. and A.N.V. acknowledge support from the Institute of Optics and the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Rochester and from the Office of Naval Research (award no. N00014-14-1-0442). L.P.N. is supported by a University of Rochester Messersmith fellowship. E.v.H. and J.M.R. acknowledge support from the Academy of Finland (project decision #260599). Finally, the authors thank C. Stroud for loaning several pieces of equipment and L. Novotny, J. Gieseler, V. Jain and R. Quidant for correspondence.

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627, USA

    • Levi P. Neukirch
  2. Center for Coherence and Quantum Optics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627, USA

    • Levi P. Neukirch
    •  & A. Nick Vamivakas
  3. Pharmaceutical Sciences Laboratory, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Åbo Akademi University, BioCity, Tykistökatu 6A, Turku 20520, Finland

    • Eva von Haartman
    •  & Jessica M. Rosenholm
  4. Institute of Optics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627, USA

    • A. Nick Vamivakas

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Contributions

L.P.N. performed the experiments. L.P.N. and A.N.V. conceived and designed the experiments, and analysed the data. E.v.H. and J.M.R. performed the nanodiamond modification. All authors co-wrote the paper.

Competing interests

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Corresponding authors

Correspondence to Levi P. Neukirch or A. Nick Vamivakas.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nphoton.2015.162

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