Review Article | Published:

The emergence of perovskite solar cells

Nature Photonics volume 8, pages 506514 (2014) | Download Citation

Abstract

The past two years have seen the unprecedentedly rapid emergence of a new class of solar cell based on mixed organic–inorganic halide perovskites. Although the first efficient solid-state perovskite cells were reported only in mid-2012, extremely rapid progress was made during 2013 with energy conversion efficiencies reaching a confirmed 16.2% at the end of the year. This increased to a confirmed efficiency of 17.9% in early 2014, with unconfirmed values as high as 19.3% claimed. Moreover, a broad range of different fabrication approaches and device concepts is represented among the highest performing devices — this diversity suggests that performance is still far from fully optimized. This Review briefly outlines notable achievements to date, describes the unique attributes of these perovskites leading to their rapid emergence and discusses challenges facing the successful development and commercialization of perovskite solar cells.

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Acknowledgements

The Australian Centre for Advanced Photonics (ACAP) is supported by the Australian Government through the Australian Renewable Energy Agency (ARENA). Responsibility for the views, information or advice expressed herein is not accepted by the Australian Government. H.J.S. is supported by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council UK and the European Research Council.

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  1. Australian Centre for Advanced Photovoltaics (ACAP), School of Photovoltaic and Renewable Energy Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052, Australia

    • Martin A. Green
    •  & Anita Ho-Baillie
  2. University of Oxford, Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU, UK

    • Henry J. Snaith

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Correspondence to Martin A. Green.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/nphoton.2014.134

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