Article | Published:

Single-nanowire solar cells beyond the Shockley–Queisser limit

Nature Photonics volume 7, pages 306310 (2013) | Download Citation

Abstract

Light management is of great importance in photovoltaic cells, as it determines the fraction of incident light entering the device. An optimal p–n junction combined with optimal light absorption can lead to a solar cell efficiency above the Shockley–Queisser limit. Here, we show how this is possible by studying photocurrent generation for a single core–shell p–i–n junction GaAs nanowire solar cell grown on a silicon substrate. At 1 sun illumination, a short-circuit current of 180 mA cm–2 is obtained, which is more than one order of magnitude higher than that predicted from the Lambert–Beer law. The enhanced light absorption is shown to be due to a light-concentrating property of the standing nanowire, as shown by photocurrent maps of the device. The results imply new limits for the maximum efficiency obtainable with IIIV based nanowire solar cells under 1 sun illumination.

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Acknowledgements

This research was funded by the ERC starting grant UpCon and by SNF (project nos 137648, 143908) and NCCR-QSIT. A.F.i.M. thanks STI for the 2011 end-of-year fund for MiBoots robots used in the scanning photocurrent experiment. A.F.i.M. and M.H. thank A. Dalmau-Mallorqui and F.M. Epple for experimental support. The authors also thank C.B. Sørensen and M.H. Madsen for assistance with MBE growth. This work was supported by the Danish National Advanced Technology Foundation (project 022-2009-1), a University of Copenhagen Center of Excellence, and by the UNIK Synthetic Biology project.

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Author notes

    • Peter Krogstrup
    • , Henrik Ingerslev Jørgensen
    •  & Martin Heiss

    These authors contributed equally to this work

Affiliations

  1. Center for Quantum Devices, Nano-Science Center, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 5, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark

    • Peter Krogstrup
    •  & Jesper Nygard
  2. SunFlake A/S, Nano-Science Center, Universitetsparken 5, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark

    • Henrik Ingerslev Jørgensen
    • , Jeppe V. Holm
    •  & Martin Aagesen
  3. Laboratoire des Matériaux Semiconducteurs, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne, Switzerland

    • Martin Heiss
    • , Olivier Demichel
    •  & Anna Fontcuberta i Morral

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Contributions

P.K. grew the nanowire p–n junctions. H.I.J. performed IV characterization and fabricated the device, with help from J.V.H. and M.A.  M.H. and O.D. performed the FDTD calculations. M.H. realized the photocurrent mappings and the external quantum efficiency measurements. A.F.i.M. and P.K. conceived and designed the experiments. A.F.i.M., J.N. and M.A. supervised the project. A.F.i.M., H.I.J., P.K. and M.H. composed the figures and wrote the manuscript. All authors discussed the results and commented on the manuscript.

Competing interests

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Corresponding authors

Correspondence to Peter Krogstrup or Anna Fontcuberta i Morral.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nphoton.2013.32

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