Lithium–oxygen batteries

The reaction mechanism revealed

Using in situ environmental transmission electron microscopy, the structural and phase changes of the reaction products of an air cathode during discharging and charging can be visualized in real time.

Access options

Rent or Buy article

Get time limited or full article access on ReadCube.

from$8.99

All prices are NET prices.

Figure 1: Reaction products of a Li−O2 cell.

References

  1. 1

    Lee, J. et al. Energy Environ. Sci. 9, 2152–2158 (2016).

  2. 2

    Bruce, P. G. et al. Nat. Mater. 11, 19–29 (2012).

  3. 3

    Lu, J. et al. Chem. Rev. 114, 5611–5640 (2014).

  4. 4

    Luo, L. et al. Nat. Nanotech. 12, 535–539 (2017).

  5. 5

    Mitchell, R. R., Gallan, B. M., Thompson C. V. & Shao-Horn, Y. Energy Environ. Sci. 4, 2952–2958 (2011).

  6. 6

    Jung, H.-G., Hassoun, J., Park, J.-B., Sun, Y.-K. & Scrosati, B. Nat. Chem. 4, 579–585 (2012).

  7. 7

    Jung, H.-G. et al. Nano Lett. 12, 4333–4335 (2012).

  8. 8

    Zhong, L. et al. Nano Lett. 13, 2209–2214 (2013).

  9. 9

    Lu, J. et al. Nature 529, 377–382 (2016).

Download references

Author information

Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Yang-Kook Sun.

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this article

Sun, Y., Yoon, C. The reaction mechanism revealed. Nature Nanotech 12, 503–504 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1038/nnano.2017.40

Download citation

Further reading