Review

Graphene nanodevices for DNA sequencing

  • Nature Nanotechnology 11, 127136 (2016)
  • doi:10.1038/nnano.2015.307
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Abstract

Fast, cheap, and reliable DNA sequencing could be one of the most disruptive innovations of this decade, as it will pave the way for personalized medicine. In pursuit of such technology, a variety of nanotechnology-based approaches have been explored and established, including sequencing with nanopores. Owing to its unique structure and properties, graphene provides interesting opportunities for the development of a new sequencing technology. In recent years, a wide range of creative ideas for graphene sequencers have been theoretically proposed and the first experimental demonstrations have begun to appear. Here, we review the different approaches to using graphene nanodevices for DNA sequencing, which involve DNA passing through graphene nanopores, nanogaps, and nanoribbons, and the physisorption of DNA on graphene nanostructures. We discuss the advantages and problems of each of these key techniques, and provide a perspective on the use of graphene in future DNA sequencing technology.

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Acknowledgements

We thank L. Vicarelli, H. W. Zandbergen, and C. Plesa for useful discussions. We acknowledge funding received from the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO/OCW) as a part of the Frontiers of Nanoscience program, and from the European Union Seventh Framework Programme under grant agreement no. 604391 (Graphene Flagship).

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Kavli Institute of Nanoscience Delft, Delft University of Technology, Lorentzweg 1, 2628 CJ Delft, The Netherlands

    • Stephanie J. Heerema
    •  & Cees Dekker

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Competing interests

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Cees Dekker.