Biological machines

Molecular motor teamwork

Synthetic muscles built from DNA nanotube scaffolds can be used to study how myosin motors work together to make real muscles function.

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Figure 1: Building synthetic muscle to better understand contraction.

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Correspondence to Edward P. Debold.

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Debold, E. Molecular motor teamwork. Nature Nanotech 10, 656–657 (2015). https://doi.org/10.1038/nnano.2015.175

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