Letter | Published:

Gold nanoparticles for high-throughput genotyping of long-range haplotypes

Nature Nanotechnology volume 6, pages 639644 (2011) | Download Citation

Abstract

Completion of the Human Genome Project1 and the HapMap Project2 has led to increasing demands for mapping complex traits in humans to understand the aetiology of diseases3. Identifying variations in the DNA sequence, which affect how we develop disease and respond to pathogens and drugs, is important for this purpose, but it is difficult to identify these variations in large sample sets3,4,5. Here we show that through a combination of capillary sequencing and polymerase chain reaction assisted by gold nanoparticles, it is possible to identify several DNA variations that are associated with age-related macular degeneration6,7,8 and psoriasis9 on significant regions of human genomic DNA. Our method is accurate and promising for large-scale and high-throughput genetic analysis of susceptibility towards disease and drug resistance10,11,12.

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Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the National 863 Program (2009AA022701), the National 973 Program (2010CB529602, 2007CB936000, 2012CB932600), the Natural Science Foundation of China (20725516, 31000553, 90913014, 20902096), the Foundation for the Author of National Excellent Doctoral Dissertation of PR China (201026), the Program for New Century Excellent Talents in University (NCET-09-0550), the Shanghai Changning Health Bureau Program (2008406002), the Shanghai Municipal Health Bureau Program (2008095), the Shanghai Leading Academic Discipline Project (B205), CAS (KJCX2-EW-N03) and the Major S&T Program (2009ZX10004-301).

Author information

Author notes

    • Peng Chen
    •  & Dun Pan

    These authors contributed equally to this work

Affiliations

  1. Key Laboratory for the Genetics of Developmental and Neuropsychiatric Disorders (Ministry of Education), Bio-X Institutes, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200030, China

    • Peng Chen
    • , Chunhai Fan
    • , Jianhua Chen
    • , Ke Huang
    • , You Li
    • , Guoyin Feng
    • , Lin He
    •  & Yongyong Shi
  2. Laboratory of Physical Biology, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800, China

    • Dun Pan
    • , Chunhai Fan
    • , Dongfang Wang
    •  & Honglu Zhang
  3. School of Life Science and Technology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200030, China

    • Peiji Liang
  4. Institute for Nutritional Sciences, Shanghai Institutes of Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031, China

    • Lin He
  5. Institutes of Biomedical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032, China

    • Lin He
  6. Changning Mental Health Center, Shanghai 200042, China

    • Yongyong Shi

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Contributions

Y.S. and C.F. conceived and designed the experiments. P.C., D.P., J.C., D.W. and H.Z. performed the experiments. J.C. and P.C. analysed the data. K.H., Y.L., P.L. and L.H. contributed materials/analysis tools. Y.S. and G.F. collected DNA samples. P.C., D.P., C.F. and Y.S. co-wrote the paper. P.C. and D.P. contributed equally to this work. All authors discussed the results and commented on the manuscript.

Competing interests

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Corresponding authors

Correspondence to Chunhai Fan or Yongyong Shi.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nnano.2011.141

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