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Chemical methods for the production of graphenes

A Corrigendum to this article was published on 01 April 2010

This article has been updated

Abstract

Interest in graphene centres on its excellent mechanical, electrical, thermal and optical properties, its very high specific surface area, and our ability to influence these properties through chemical functionalization. There are a number of methods for generating graphene and chemically modified graphene from graphite and derivatives of graphite, each with different advantages and disadvantages. Here we review the use of colloidal suspensions to produce new materials composed of graphene and chemically modified graphene. This approach is both versatile and scalable, and is adaptable to a wide variety of applications.

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Figure 1: Graphite oxide and graphene oxide.
Figure 2: CMG oxide sheets.
Figure 3: Graphene sheets from graphite derivatives.

Change history

  • 21 March 2010

    In the version of this Review Article originally published, the unit for conductivity in the first line of Table 2 should have been S cm−1. This error has been corrected in the HTML and PDF versions of the text.

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Acknowledgements

R.S.R. acknowledges previous support from NASA and current support from the state of Texas, and DARPA iMINT and DARPA CERA for support of graphene-related research.

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Correspondence to Rodney S. Ruoff.

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Park, S., Ruoff, R. Chemical methods for the production of graphenes. Nature Nanotech 4, 217–224 (2009). https://doi.org/10.1038/nnano.2009.58

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