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Bioimaging

Second window for in vivo imaging

Nature Nanotechnology volume 4, pages 710711 (2009) | Download Citation

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Enhanced fluorescence from carbon nanotubes and advances in near-infrared cameras have opened up a new wavelength window for small animal imaging.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Andrew M. Smith, Michael C. Mancini and Shuming Nie are in the Departments of Biomedical Engineering and Chemistry, Emory University and Georgia Institute of Technology, 101 Woodruff Circle Suite 2007, Atlanta, Georgia 30322, USA.

    • Andrew M. Smith
    • , Michael C. Mancini
    •  & Shuming Nie

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Corresponding author

Correspondence to Shuming Nie.

About this article

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Published

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nnano.2009.326

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