Instrumentation

Carbon nanotubes on the brain

Article metrics

The performance of metal electrodes used for studying brain function and relieving the symptoms of medical conditions can be significantly improved by coating them with carbon nanotubes.

Access optionsAccess options

Rent or Buy article

Get time limited or full article access on ReadCube.

from$8.99

All prices are NET prices.

Figure 1: Spectrographs from 20 seconds of brain activity recorded from the motor cortex of an anaesthetized rat using bare metal electrodes (left) and nanotube/polypyrrole-coated electrodes (right) over two different frequency ranges: 0–300 Hz (lower panel) and 300–3,000 Hz (upper panel).

References

  1. 1

    Schwartz, A. B., Cui, X. T., Weber, D. J. & Moran, D. W. Neuron 52, 205–220 (2006).

  2. 2

    Hochberg, L. R. et al. Nature 442, 164–171 (2006).

  3. 3

    Keefer, E. W., Botterman, B. R., Romero, M. I., Rossi, A. F. & Gross, G. W. Nature Nanotech. 3, 434–439 (2008).

  4. 4

    Bekyarova, E. et al. J Biomed. Nanotech. 1, 3–17 (2005).

  5. 5

    Liu, Z. et al. Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 105, 1410–1415 (2008).

  6. 6

    Cui, X., Wiler, J., Dzaman, M., Altschuler, R. A. & Martin, D. C. Biomaterials 24, 777–787 (2003).

  7. 7

    Hubel, D. H. Science 125, 549–550 (1957).

  8. 8

    Bekyarova, E., Haddon, R. C. & Parpura, V. in Biofunctionalization of Nanomaterials (ed. Kumar, C. S. S. R.) 41–71 (Wiley, 2005).

  9. 9

    Pantano, P. & Kuhr, W. G. Anal. Chem. 65, 623–630 (1993).

Download references

Author information

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Further reading