Nanomedicine

Elastic clues in cancer detection

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In vitro nanomechanical studies have shown that cultured cancer cells are elastically softer than healthy ones, and new measurements on cells from cancer patients suggest that this mechanical signature may be a powerful way to detect cancer in the clinic.

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Figure 1: Detecting cancer by probing the elastic properties of cells outside the body.

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Suresh, S. Elastic clues in cancer detection. Nature Nanotech 2, 748–749 (2007) doi:10.1038/nnano.2007.397

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