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Linker-free directed assembly of high-performance integrated devices based on nanotubes and nanowires

Nature Nanotechnology volume 1, pages 6671 (2006) | Download Citation

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Abstract

Advanced electronic devices based on carbon nanotubes (NTs) and various types of nanowires (NWs) could have a role in next-generation semiconductor architectures. However, the lack of a general fabrication method has held back the development of these devices for practical applications. Here we report an assembly strategy for devices based on NTs and NWs. Inert surface molecular patterns were used to direct the adsorption and alignment of NTs and NWs on bare surfaces to form device structures without the use of linker molecules. Substrate bias further enhanced the amount of NT and NW adsorption. Significantly, as all the processing steps can be performed with conventional microfabrication facilities, our method is readily accessible to the present semiconductor industry. We use this method to demonstrate large-scale assembly of NT- and NW-based integrated devices and their applications. We also provide extensive analysis regarding the reliability of the method.

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Acknowledgements

This project has been supported by the Korean Science and Engineering Foundation through the National Research Laboratory program and Tera-level Nano Devices program. S.H. acknowledges partial support from the Nano-Systems Institute–National Core Research Center and the Korean Ministry of Commerce, Industry, and Energy. Y.-K.K. acknowledges partial support from the Nanomanufacturing Center of Excellence.

Author information

Affiliations

  1. School of Physics, Seoul National University, Kwanak-Gu, Shilim-Dong, Seoul 151-747, Korea

    • M. Lee
    • , J. Im
    • , B. Y. Lee
    • , S. Myung
    • , J. Kang
    •  & S. Hong
  2. Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208, USA

    • L. Huang
  3. Department of Physics and Applied Physics, University of Massachusetts, Lowell, Massachusetts 01854, USA

    • Y.-K. Kwon

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Contributions

M.L., J.I., and J.K. performed SWNT experiments and analyses: B.Y.L. performed NT-based biosensor experiments; S.M., M.L. and J.I. performed V2O5 NW experiments; Y.-K.K. and L.H. contributed to data analyses and interpretation of the results; and S.H. conceived and designed the experiments.

Competing interests

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to S. Hong.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nnano.2006.46

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