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Modulation of cochlear hair cells by the auditory cortex in the mustached bat

Nature Neuroscience volume 5, pages 5763 (2002) | Download Citation

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  • An Erratum to this article was published on 01 February 2002

Abstract

The corticofugal (descending) auditory system forms multiple feedback loops, and adjusts and improves auditory signal processing in the subcortical auditory nuclei. However, the mechanism by which the corticofugal system modulates cochlear hair cells has been unexplored. We found that electric stimulation of cortical neurons via the corticofugal system modulates cochlear hair cells in a highly specific way according to the relationship in terms of best frequency between cortical neurons and hair cells. Such frequency-specific effects can be explained by selective corticofugal modulation of individual olivocochlear efferent fibers.

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Acknowledgements

We thank O.W. Henson, S. Kuwada, N. Laleman and M.C. Liberman for their comments, the Ministry of Agriculture, Land and Marine Resources in Trinidad and Tobago for permitting us to collect the mustached bats, and F. Muradali for exporting them to the USA. This work was supported by a research grant from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communicative Disorders (DC-00175).

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  1. Department of Biology, Washington University, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, Missouri 63130, USA

    • Zhongju Xiao
    •  & Nobuo Suga

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Correspondence to Nobuo Suga.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nn786

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