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Long-term preservation of cortically dependent visual function in RCS rats by transplantation

Nature Neuroscience volume 5, pages 5356 (2002) | Download Citation

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Abstract

Cell transplantation is one way of limiting the progress of retinal degeneration in animal models of blinding diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Here we transplanted a human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell line into the subretinal space of one such model, the Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rat, and showed, using head tracking to moving stripes and pattern discrimination in conjunction with single-unit cortical physiology, that cortically mediated vision can be preserved with this treatment.

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Acknowledgements

This work was supported by grants from Wellcome Trust, Neurotech, SA and the Foundation Fighting Blindness. R.L. holds the Calvin and JeNeal Hatch Chair of Ophthalmology. We thank N. Kanuga for help with the supply and characterization of the cell line, and T. Pheby and R. Howes for preparation of the histological material.

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Affiliations

  1. Department of Psychology, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield, S10 2TP, UK

    • P. J. Coffey
    •  & L. Hetherington
  2. Department of Ophthalmology, Moran Eye Center, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84132, USA

    • S. Girman
    • , S. M. Wang
    •  & R. D. Lund
  3. Institute of Ophthalmology, University College, London, 11-43 Bath St., London EC1V 9EL, UK

    • D. J. Keegan
    • , P. Adamson
    • , J. Greenwood
    •  & R. D. Lund

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Correspondence to R. D. Lund.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/nn782

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