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Induction of sharp wave–ripple complexes in vitro and reorganization of hippocampal networks

Nature Neuroscience volume 8, pages 15601567 (2005) | Download Citation

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Abstract

Hippocampal sharp wave–ripple complexes (SPW-Rs) occur during slow-wave sleep and behavioral immobility and are thought to represent stored information that is transferred to the neocortex during memory consolidation. Here we show that stimuli that induce long-term potentiation (LTP), a neurophysiological correlate of learning and memory, can lead to the generation of SPW-Rs in rat hippocampal slices. The induced SPW-Rs have properties that are identical to spontaneously generated SPW-Rs: they originate in CA3, propagate to CA1 and subiculum and require AMPA/kainate receptors. Their induction is dependent on NMDA receptors and involves changes in interactions between clusters of neurons in the CA3 network. Their expression is blocked by low-frequency stimulation but not by NMDA receptor antagonists. These data indicate that induction of LTP in the recurrent CA3 network may facilitate the generation of SPW-Rs.

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Acknowledgements

This research was supported by the Sonderforschungsbereich 515. We are grateful for discussions with M.J. Gutnick and D. Schmitz, and for technical assistance and the development of data analysis tools by H. Siegmund and H.J. Gabriel. We acknowledge participation of N. Maggio in some of the recordings in dorsal hippocampal slices.

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Affiliations

  1. Institute for Neurophysiology, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Tucholskystrasse 2, 10117 Berlin, Germany.

    • Christoph J Behrens
    • , Leander P van den Boom
    • , Livia de Hoz
    • , Alon Friedman
    •  & Uwe Heinemann
  2. Department of Neurosurgery, Zlotowski Centre for Neuroscience, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev and Soroka Medical Center, Beer-Sheva, 84105 Israel.

    • Alon Friedman

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The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Uwe Heinemann.

Supplementary information

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  1. 1.

    Supplementary Fig. 1

    Spontaneous SPW-R activity recorded in the CA3 region.

  2. 2.

    Supplementary Fig. 2

    SPW-R induction parallels induction of LTP in area CA3.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nn1571

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