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Shift of activity from attention to motor-related brain areas during visual learning

Nature Neuroscience volume 8, pages 14941496 (2005) | Download Citation

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Abstract

With practice, we become increasingly efficient at visual object comparisons. This may be due to the formation of a memory template that not only binds individual features together to create an object, but also links the object with an associated response. In a longitudinal fMRI study of object matching, evidence for this link between perception and action was observed as a shift of activation from visual-attentive processing areas along the posterior intraparietal sulcus to hand-sensory and motor-related areas.

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Change history

  • 09 October 2005

    Replaced supplementary methods.

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Acknowledgements

This work was supported by a grant from the Gertrud Reemtsma Stiftung to M.M. and by Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft grant Po 548/3–1 to S.P.

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Department of Experimental Psychology, Otto von Guericke University, Postbox 4120, 39016 Magdeburg, Germany.

    • Stefan Pollmann
    •  & Marianne Maertens
  2. Day Clinic of Cognitive Neurology, University of Leipzig, Liebigstrasse 22a, 04103 Leipzig, Germany.

    • Stefan Pollmann
    •  & Marianne Maertens
  3. Department of Cognitive Neurology, Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Stephanstrasse 1a, 04103 Leipzig, Germany.

    • Marianne Maertens

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Competing interests

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Stefan Pollmann.

Supplementary information

PDF files

  1. 1.

    Supplementary Fig. 1

    Event-related fMRI-signal time courses for trials with left hand and right hand responses averaged across tasks.

  2. 2.

    Supplementary Fig. 2

    Event-related fMRI signal timecourses for matching of category identity (a) and physical identity (b) in the horizontal segment of right intraparietal sulcus.

  3. 3.

    Supplementary Fig. 3

    Correlation between an late / early learning ratio and late signal increase in postcentral gyrus.

  4. 4.

    Supplementary Table 1

    List of functional activations.

  5. 5.

    Supplementary Methods

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nn1552

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