A Drosophila fearomone response proceeds through a single glomerulus

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Relating a particular odorant to a specific behavior has proven difficult. A recent study in Nature uses clever technology to show that fruit flies possess a specialized olfactory pathway that allows them to sense, and react to, elevated levels of carbon dioxide.

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Figure 1: Drosophila antennal lobe, imaged before and after the fly was exposed to 1% carbon dioxide.

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Quinn, W. A Drosophila fearomone response proceeds through a single glomerulus. Nat Neurosci 7, 1290–1291 (2004) doi:10.1038/nn1204-1290

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