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Visual and action cues contribute to the self–other distinction

Nature Neuroscience volume 7, pages 422423 (2004) | Download Citation

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The extrastriate body area was first identified because it responds to visual images of human body parts. Now a functional imaging study finds that it also responds to self-produced body movements, even when the moving body part is not visible.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Marc Jeannerod is in the Institut des Sciences Cognitives, Lyon, France. jeannerod@isc.cnrs.fr

    • Marc Jeannerod

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nn0504-422

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