Language evolution: neural differences that make a difference

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Language is unique to humans, but did it evolve gradually or suddenly, from a chance mutation or as a consequence of a larger brain? Two studies now suggest that language may have arisen gradually from precursors in other primates.

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Figure 1: Changes to the communication-related neural circuitry in humans occurred gradually in the primate lineage.

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